Valve interested in Onlive, their games might appear on service

Far from spurning OnLive as a worrying threat to his Steam business, Valve boss Gabe Newell “really likes” the games-on-demand service. At least, that’s according to OnLive.

The Cloud gaming company has told CVG that it has engaged in “conversations” with Valve boss Gabe Newell about working more closely together, and that it considers the exec and his business as “friends”.

And that’s not all – Valve has even given the California-based start-up advice on what to include in the future feature set of its service.

“Gabe and his team really like what we’re doing,” said OnLive VP of Engineering Joe Bentley. “I can’t go into specifics of any conversations we’ve had but we have had conversations with everybody in the industry. They really dig OnLive. Gabe is a funny guy because he’s really not competitive – very similar to Randy [Pitchford]. He sees us a complementary in a lot of different ways.

“If you get to know Valve as a company, Steam was something that they just had to do because nobody else was handling a decent digital distribution model. Gabe and his team’s hearts are really in making games like Portal 2 and so forth. If you see where Portal 2 is, it’s on every other platform.

“If Gabe was so intent on Steam’s dominance he would make it exclusive on Steam, but that’s not what he is. He’s about making the best quality games out there.

“He’s really fascinated with our features and given us a lot of suggestions, they’ve got similar features coming out and we’ve chatted about really innovative ideas. I regard him and the company as friends. Sure we’re going to have other people doing similar things, but the industry is big enough. We’re only a 200 person start-up, we don’t need to own it all, there’s something for everybody.”

OnLive showed its service off on a range of mobile devices at E3 earlier this month, including iPad. Bentley showed CVG how the company’s controller will soon sync wirelessly with most popular tablets on the market. (See below for a video of OnLive CEO Steve Perlman demonstrating the tech in Los Angeles.)

Bentley told us: “For me, Steam can’t really take their game to that mobile level… Gabe [Newell] walks around with his iPad so he sees OnLive and maybe thinks about how he can get Portal out to the world to the mobile market without compromises.”

UK gamers can already sign up to OnLive ahead of its launch .

BT has the exclusive rights to bundle OnLive together with its broadband service offerings in the UK, although customers will also have the option to order directly from OnLive to run over any UK ISP.

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Sony working on equal amounts of Vita and PS3 games

From CVG:

Sony has told CVG that the number of titles being created for PlayStation Vita roughly matches PS3’s production pipeline – a step change in focus since the PSP days.

Speaking before E3, Sony’s head of WorldWide Studios Suhei Yoshida told us that the company’s decision to concentrate much more on PS3 software than PSP titles was a “mistake” and hurt the handheld.

However, he asserted that it wasn’t an error Sony would be making twice.

“We are doing about the same number of titles [on Vita as on PS3] so that means a lot,” he stated. “One of the things we didn’t do to well to support PSP was that right after PSP came out we moved on to working on the PS3 launch titles.

“So we shifted too much resource out of PSP so after a couple of years the PSP support when quickly down.

“We tried to back it up a couple of years ago but there was a time where we were not offering enough PSP content. So going forward we do not want to make the same mistake so we always look at the balance that we are doing in support of both PS3 and NGP.”

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Sega, Ubisoft, and others discuss Wii U support

Ubisoft CEO Yves Guillemot:

“We will announce one game that we want to launch day one that is a new type of game, which should be interesting. It is still very important, just because you can test a market and also see through the eyes of the first consumers. They are the people that actually have the word of mouth factor. The trendsetters. It doesn’t increase [costs] very much because the advantage is in being close to the other machines, you can do the game for all the formats at the same time.”

EA Games label president Frank Gibeau:

“It served us well on PlayStation 2 and PlayStation 3. Getting in early is partly about being a successful transition company and figuring out where the hardware is going to go. With the Wii U it’s important for us to get there on day one so we can get in and build as big an audience as possible. We’ve been doing this for 25 years and trying to pick platforms and more often than not we get it right. I hope we have this one right. That’s the gamble.”

Sega West president Mike Hayes:

“At some point we were the biggest, certainly top three third-party publisher on Wii, so for us it was a great platform… we’ve got absolutely no qualms about [Wii U]. I just think we’re all a bit premature in being a bit glass half full on 3DS. Everyone was clamouring ‘oh please bring it out in March, you must bring it out’ and then it’s like you get to June and it’s all ‘sales aren’t very good…’ Well, they haven’t got the software yet. That controller is absolutely brilliant and we have to think of innovative ways to use it. We’re doing high definition Sonics, we’re doing obviously Aliens: Colonial Marines, so you can bring them across, and that’s relatively low cost, which is good news. Then you spend your money on how do you use that controller effectively to make it unique and differentiate it.”

Karl Slatoff, chief operating officer at Take-Two:

“For us it’s really about understanding what the hardware capabilities are and understand how it’s going to fit into what our goals are from a franchise creation perspective. Really understanding what that platform can deliver and developing for that platform. So that’s our philosophy, not just with the new Nintendo console but across the board. Whether we’re looking at the 3DS or the PlayStation Vita or any of the new formats that are coming out. We can’t look at them all the same way. We’re not just going to port over.”

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Iwata confirms Wii U doesnt play Bluray/DVD


During an E3 Expo Q&A session, Iwata revealed Wii U won’t have Bluray/DVD playback:

Q: Are you planning on making the Wii U more of a home entertainment console by including Blu-ray or DVD drives, or is it going to be more like the Wii, and just be more of a pure gaming console?

Iwata:

Wii U does not have DVD or Blu-ray playback capabilities.

The reason for that is that we feel that enough people already have devices that are capable of playing DVDs and Blu-ray, such that it didn’t warrant the cost involved to build that functionality into the Wii U console because of the patents related to those technologies.

I believe he has a point. By now, most people own more than 1 dvd player.

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Activision comments on Wii U and core games

“I think Nintendo’s an incredible company and it looks like this is a platform that’s going to be even more relevant to the kinds of games we make. They’re committing to HD, greater processing power, digital infrastructure, connected universe at the back end…Those are all the things we need to make a state of the art experience for a lot of games. So we were thrilled to hear their plans and I think that anyone that bets against Nintendo does so at their peril. They’re a pretty great company. Anytime one of the first parties gives us new technology to play with and new toys in the toy box it’s great for our developers. Now, choosing which ones we’re going to use and choosing which ones we’re going to get on board with, it all has to do with what we think is going to make the best game. There are some first person shooters out there that are using motion control and Kinect and we’re not and that’s a conscious choice. Call of Duty runs at 60 fps. It’s an incredibly precise game. It’s an incredibly smooth game. We still think the DualShock controller is the best way to deliver that game. But there are other games where new innovations make all the sense in the world. I was very excited about some of the things that I saw in the Wii U because I thought it was an innovative take on the next gen controller and the next gen console. I was really excited to see Nintendo taking their console into something that I think is going to be friendlier to core games. Trying to make a Call of Duty experience on the Wii, you’ve got to make real sacrifices in the game just based on processing power and some of the other limitations of that console. This one seems like it’s going to be a lot friendlier to the kind of games that we generally make.”

Activision Publishing’s Eric Hirshberg

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Xmen: Destiny E3 gameplay trailer

Katsuya Eguchi talks about Metroid and Wii U

“I can’t give you any details now, but I’m sure there will be a new Metroid release making use of the new controller, not just to control Samus and her ship but also to give the player a new source of information. Maybe the player is looking at the screen but has the information that they need to defeat the enemy in their hands. You could look through the screen and scan your enemy and find where it’s weakspot is.”

Nintendo’s Katsuya Eguchi

My only concern is Metroid being developed in-house or outsourced. Hopefully Nintendo learns “Other M” and makes the game better.

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